Tag Archives: people

Leadership

The Abrasive Boss: Business Impact, Cost, Survival and Intervention – Part II

The Abrasive Boss
Tangible and Intangible Costs

One of the primary clues that you have an abrasive boss in residence is a high turnover rate among employees, and long term employees are there because they can’t afford to quit, but are often into what I call the R3 mode – resist, resent and revenge.  Productivity is often below standard. (A side note: Abrasiveness can also be a characteristic of staff whose behavior is just not being handled by the boss. This situation can also result in unhappy employees, R3 mode, and increasing turnover.)The problems: the work keeps getting interrupted with resignations, hiring details, orientations for new employees, and sick days for illness or injuries on and off the job among the longer term employees.  Doesn’t matter where you are: high turnover = low morale.

The real problems begin to occur as gradually, the ‘soft’ expenses begin to rise and encroach on the profit margin. The cause: reduced teamwork; training time costs as in- house staff are pulled away from their regular duties to train new employees; close to a six month lag time in maximum output as new employees get up to speed; employee payouts as they leave and, increasing sick days and lost work days among those who stay, adding to the tally of decreasing output.  Doesn’t matter where you are: low morale = lowered output.

The slide to left side of the ledger is often insidious. Unless someone is paying close attention, it may not be noticed until it is a challenge to financially manage a turnaround.  Because the costs are ‘soft’ costs when a part time employee or short-term employee leaves, an organization may not actually cost out the actual expense. This is a mistake. The costs are real in real time.  More companies are now paying attention to those costs, but not always diagnosing the right problem.

Read More
Leadership

Abrasive Bosses in Business: Impacts, Costs, Survival, and Interventions – Part I

The Abrasive Boss

Description of the Abrasive Boss:

  • Clipped speech
  • Little eye contact or ‘drilling’ eye contact; frown appears whenever he or she turns in your direction
  • Aggressive postures such as leaning forward into the other person’s space; stance: legs akimbo, hands on hips; facial frowning with little or no smiling
  • Intensity as a way of being; excitability, volatility with unexpected outbursts
  • Long on demands and short on compliments or verbal rewards; low on social skills usage
  • May take credit for work done by others

If any of this fits you or someone you know in your organization, it’s time to reflect on the impact on your business – whether big or small in size.

A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.

Arnold H. Glasgow

Most of us who have been around for a while have run into the ‘boss’ or supervisor who fits into this category of ‘abrasive’. Others call them the toxic bosses. They are often bright, ambitious, focused, and ‘on’ the majority of the time. They are tough, to the point, demanding, and just simply ‘want the job done’.  These characteristics do not necessarily win them the title of abrasive. The real kicker is that they are short on respect, dish disrespect out liberally and, usually don’t get much respect back – something they often complain about.

Read More
Sales

Reselling and Retelling “The Art of Selling”

art of selling

“Making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art.”

– Andy Warhol

The most successful sales technique for the long-term survival of your business is simply caring about the people you meet. It is about building a relationship, and developing a rapport with the potential customer.

You create a team with each customer, and your team requires teamwork.

Know that absolutely every person you meet is either a potential customer or knows someone who is.

“Sales are contingent upon the attitude of the salesman – not the attitude of the prospect.”

-W. Clement Stone

Good business is the art of asking the right question at the right time that conveys the right amount of interest in what the potential customers’ circumstances are. You then use that information to guide them, through additional questions, to the answer that is going to give you the sale or get you the contract.

Read More